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Equifax Breach Lessons Learned

Equifax Breach Lessons Learned

After reading the Equifax breach report released by U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. This would be a great post to summarize and list out key items that went wrong in the Equifax breach. Hopefully, it will lead to a wake up call for other companies in order to better their own information security. 

 

Security Representative on the Core team

It’s highly important to have someone that understands information security on your core team. Many times, the task gets pushed to the Legal or IT team core team members. This is one of the reasons that led to the breach. IT operational tasks and security tasks need to fall under a specific leader. Ideally, someone that understand security and not just IT. In Equifax’s case, security was represented by the IT team core member. However, their views were not in line with the security team leader. Therefore, something that may be of risk may not reach the CEO’s level and will get missed. However, Read The Full Post

Review of SEC545 Cloud Security Architecture and Operations

SEC545: Cloud Security Architecture and Operations

Just recently I went to attend a local SANS Community class in my city. For those that are not aware, SANS Community classes are usually smaller classes with 5-10+ students. It’s a small venue with more of a small class size, but the material would be the same that SANS would teach on vLive, OnDemand, or at a SANS conference.

I can say that the SEC545: Cloud Security Architecture and Operations class is VERY popular. There were many students there that were not hardcore SANS enthusiasts such as myself. Many people were there on the basis that companies are all now starting to move to the cloud. And, many companies are worried about the security implications of moving, and with larger concerns on if the architecture is not setup and configured correctly.

The class was very much AWS focused, which was great for me in terms of learning AWS. However, Read The Full Post

SEC 542 SANS Course Review

SEC 542 SANS Course Review

So I wanted to post a blog post on my experience related to the SEC 542 course. This way I can share my experience out there with others, and hopefully give others insight to see if the course is a right fit for them too.

Now because I took the vLive course, my course was not a 4-6 day course. This course was actually completed over 6+ weeks with 2 class sessions per a week. This was an excellent course, very well designed and presented out to students. There were things I already knew and had experienced. But, there were a lot of tools that were introduced in the course, which I had not used or heard of before. And, these tools definitely help save some time especially when it comes down to recon.

I’ll briefly list some of the things you learn during each week, but for the full list you’ll have to take the course for yourself. Trust me, it’s an awesome course! Read The Full Post

NCIX Data Breach

NCIX Data Breach

One of the biggest news items around recently has been the NCIX Breach. I was notified of it through a colleague prior to the media finding out about it through the following blog –> (https://www.privacyfly.com/articles/ncix_breach/). The blog details events that took place where a person uncovered hard drives left by the now bankrupt NCIX computer retailer. The warehouse housing these drives, and left over computers that belonged to NCIX were being sold off by the warehouse landlord. The information based off privacyfly’s blog seems to point towards the landlord illegally selling the data on the drives to recuperate lost rent. The big question here is how NCIX, or the team taking care of their assets after bankruptcy could allow this information to be sold. And, this also goes to show how NCIX has very weak security procedues in place to safeguard their most vital data (customer and employee data). Read The Full Post

Automating NMAP Scans

Automating NMAP Scans

 

Why do I need automation ?

Security analysts just don’t have the time to always run manual tests. Let’s say I wanted to monitor my ports and services open on my external lab IP address. It is not feasible for me to run a scan at 3am every day for the rest of my life. Therefore, if I had a tool that could automatically run a scan, check to see if anything suspicious is found and can alert me if that is the case would be hugely beneficial. In my case, I have created a method to do this and it is a very simple and straight forward method that virtually any one can use!

 

How can I create a NMAP scanning server ?

Servers are pretty easy to put up whether it’s a Virtual Image that’s spun up on a bare box, desktop, or in the cloud. In my case a Linux Ubuntu Server was used. It has a firewall and is assigned an external public IP address. It then has the ability to scan my lab network public IP address to be able to identify any open ports/services. It’s a great way to gain some visibility into knowing if any new ports were opened that shouldn’t have been or were missed.

*WARNING* please be sure that the network you are scanning is your own, or that you have WRITTEN PERMISSION to scan the network you desire. Scanning networks where you have no written permission can lead to legal issues, so please be sure you have permission or ownership of a network before doing so.

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